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Referencing Guidelines
A citation is a passage or opinion from a book, article or webpage etc., made in such a way that a reader can identify it.
A reference is a direction to a book, article or webpage etc., where certain information may be found; an indication of the author,
work, page etc., to be looked at or consulted.
A reference list is a collection of references.
Referencing is the term given to the linking of the citations within the body of your work and the reference list. Those reading
your work must be able to follow the link between your work and the articles, books etc., on your list.
You must ONLY reference items that are cited within your work. You must acknowledge any source that you refer to in your assignment, both within the text of your essay and at the end of it (by including a list of references). Referencing your sources also enables the reader to view your sources and follow your essay as well as acknowledging the works of others on the subject. If you use sources but don’t cite them either within the text or in your reference list, you could be accused of plagiarism, which is a serious charge. Citations in your work
Citations within the work direct readers to the reference list at the end of the work. The author’s surname, year of publication
(and page number(s) if appropriate) should appear in the work.
If the author’s name does not form part of the statement in the work, put name, date and page number in brackets.
Example:
There is evidence (Smith 1990, p23) that the statistical analysis is unsound.
If the author’s name forms part of the statement put the date and page number in brackets.
Example:
Smith (1990, p23) cited evidence that the statistical analysis is unsound.
If there are 6 or more authors, write the name of the first author followed by et.al.
Example:
Supporting evidence appears in a study by Black (cited in Smith and Jones, 1990, p64).
“Cited in” indicates that the reference to Black’s study was found in Smith and Jones. Include only Smith and Jones in your list.
To cite a website with a known author use only the name of the author followed by the year the page was last updated.
Example:
The National Aids Manual (2001) suggests that abacavir may be used.
When the author of a website is unknown or when citing a homepage give the web address (also known as the URL) of the site
followed by the year the page was last updated.
Example:
Over 6m people expressed an interest in UK nurse training in 1999 according to the English National Board
http://www.enb.org.uk/ (2001)
Quotation marks are used on direct quotations from speech and writing. Quotes of less than three lines can be included in the
work.
Example: Smith (1990, p23) concluded that “there was a fundamental discrepancy in the original data”. However quotes of more than three lines should be separated from the work and indented. Reference Lists: General Principles
References are arranged alphabetically by authors’ surnames. Separate surnames with commas; use initials, NOT first name; use
the ampersand “&” not “and” to separate surnames. For printed books and articles use capitals for the first letter of the first word
of the title and proper names; use small letters for all other words. Underline the title of books and journals; do NOT underline the
title of articles. Separate the parts of the reference i.e. author, date, title etc with a full stop and two spaces. Separate place of publication and publisher with a colon and a space. a) Printed books
Author. (Date of publication). Title. (Edition if not first edition). Place of publication: Publisher.
Example:
Carpenito, L.J. (1999). Nursing care plans and documentation: nursing diagnoses and collaborative problems. (3rd ed).
Philadelphia: Lippincott.
b) Electronic books
Author. (Date of publication). Title. [online]. (Edition if not first edition). Place of publication: Publisher. Available from: URL.
[Accessed date].
Example Carpenito, L.J. (1999). Nursing care plans and documentation: nursing diagnoses and collaborative problems. [online]. (3rd ed). Philadelphia: Lippincott. Available from: http://gateway.ovid.com [Accessed 26th March 2003]. c) Printed journal article
Author of article. (Date of publication). ‘Title of article’. Title of journal. Volume number, (Issue number if any), Page number(s).
Example:
Swift, C.G. (2001) ‘Falls in late life and their consequences: implementing effective services’. B.M.J. 322, (7290), p.855-857.

d) Electronic journal article
Author of article. (Date of publication). ‘Title of article’. Title of journal. [online]. Volume number, (Issue number if any). Available
from: URL [Accessed date]
Example: Swift, C.G. (2001) ‘Falls in late life and their consequences: implementing effective services’. B.M.J. [online]. 322, (7290). Available from: http://gateway.ovid.com [Accessed 14 August 2003] e) Printed newspaper article
Name of author(s) if available. (Year of publication). ‘Title of article’. Name of newspaper. Day and month, Page number(s),
(Column number).
Example:
Norton-Taylor, R. (2001). ‘Amnesty attacks Britain on asylum’. Guardian. 31 May, p11, (1-2).
f) Electronic newspaper article
Name of author(s) if available. (Year of publication). ‘Title of article’. Name of newspaper. [online]. Day and month, Page
number(s) if given. Available from: URL [Accessed date].
Example: Norton-Taylor, R. (2001). ‘Amnesty attacks Britain on asylum’. Guardian [online]. 31 May. Available from: http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4195474,00.htm [Accessed 27th August 2001]. g) Printed government report
Government Department. (Date of publication). Title of report. [Popular title]. Place of publication: Publisher. Series details
Example:
Department of Health. (2000). The NHS plan: a plan for investment, a plan for reform. London: Stationery Office. (Cm; 4818-1).
h) Electronic Government Report
Government Department. (Date of publication). Title of report. [Popular title]. [online]. Place of publication: Publisher. Series
details (if any). Available from: URL [Accessed date]
Example: Department of Health. (2000). The NHS plan: a plan for investment, a plan for reform. [online]. London: Stationery Office. (Cm; 4818-1). Available fromssed 26 August 2001]

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