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Chemwatch msds 4614-46

EQUINE RAZOR WORMER
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
For Workplace - Small Volume Use Only.

CHEMWATCH 4614-46
Issue Date: 7-Sep-2006
CD 2006/3 Page 1 of 9
NC317ELP
Section 1 - CHEMICAL PRODUCT AND COMPANY IDENTIFICATION
PRODUCT NAME
SYNONYMS
PRODUCT USE
Oral anthelmintic for horses. Administered into the back of a horse' s mouth.
SUPPLIER
Company: ArcherVet Pty Ltd
Address:
26 Park Avenue (PO Box 285)
Gordon
NSW 2072
AUS
Telephone: (02) 9498 1384
Fax: (02) 9498 3444
Section 2 - HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
STATEMENT OF HAZARDOUS NATURE
HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE. NON-DANGEROUS GOODS. According to the Criteria of
NOHSC, and the ADG Code.

POISONS SCHEDULE
Avoid exposure - obtain special instructionsbefore use.
To clean the floor and all objects contaminatedby this material, use water and detergent.
This material and its container must be disposedof in a safe way.
Keep away from food, drink and animal feedingstuffs.
Take off immediately all contaminated clothing.
Section 3 - COMPOSITION / INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
continued.
EQUINE RAZOR WORMER
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
For Workplace - Small Volume Use Only.

CHEMWATCH 4614-46
Issue Date: 7-Sep-2006
CD 2006/3 Page 2 of 9
NC317ELP
Section 4 - FIRST AID MEASURES
SWALLOWED
For advice, contact a Poisons Information Centre or a doctor.
If this product comes in contact with eyes:- Wash out immediately with water.
- If irritation continues, seek medical attention.
- Removal of contact lenses after an eye injury should only be undertaken by skilledpersonnel.
If skin contact occurs:- Immediately remove all contaminated clothing, including footwear- Flush skin and hair with running water (and soap if available).
- Seek medical attention in event of irritation.
- If fumes or combustion products are inhaled remove from contaminated area.
- Other measures are usually unnecessary.
NOTES TO PHYSICIAN
Section 5 - FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES
EXTINGUISHING MEDIA
- Foam.
- Dry chemical powder.
- BCF (where regulations permit).
- Carbon dioxide.
- Water spray or fog - Large fires only.
FIRE FIGHTING
- Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
- Wear breathing apparatus plus protective gloves.
- Prevent, by any means available, spillage from entering drains or water course.
- Use water delivered as a fine spray to control fire and cool adjacent area.
- Avoid spraying water onto liquid pools.
- Do not approach containers suspected to be hot.
- Cool fire exposed containers with water spray from a protected location.
- If safe to do so, remove containers from path of fire.
FIRE/EXPLOSION HAZARD
- Combustible.
- Slight fire hazard when exposed to heat or flame.
- Heating may cause expansion or decomposition leading to violent rupture of containers.
- On combustion, may emit toxic fumes of carbon monoxide (CO).
- May emit acrid smoke.
- Mists containing combustible materials may be explosive.
Other combustion products include:
carbon dioxide (CO2).
nitrogen oxides (NOx).
other pyrolysis products typical of burning organic material.
continued.
EQUINE RAZOR WORMER
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
For Workplace - Small Volume Use Only.

CHEMWATCH 4614-46
Issue Date: 7-Sep-2006
CD 2006/3 Page 3 of 9
NC317ELP
Section 5 - FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES
FIRE INCOMPATIBILITY
Avoid contamination with oxidising agents i.e. nitrates, oxidising acids, chlorine
bleaches, pool chlorine etc. as ignition may result.
HAZCHEM: None
Section 6 - ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
MINOR SPILLS
Wear impervious gloves and safety goggles.
Place spilled material in clean, dry, sealed container.
MAJOR SPILLS
Minor hazard.
- Clear area of personnel.
- Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
- Control personal contact by using protective equipment as required.
- Prevent spillage from entering drains or water ways.
- Contain spill with sand, earth or vermiculite.
- Collect recoverable product into labelled containers for recycling.
- Absorb remaining product with sand, earth or vermiculite and place in appropriatecontainers for disposal.
- Wash area and prevent runoff into drains or waterways.
- If contamination of drains or waterways occurs, advise emergency services.
Personal Protective Equipment advice is contained in Section 8 of the MSDS.
Section 7 - HANDLING AND STORAGE
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING
- Limit all unnecessary personal contact.
- Wear protective clothing when risk of exposure occurs.
- Use in a well-ventilated area.
- When handling DO NOT eat, drink or smoke.
- Always wash hands with soap and water after handling.
- Avoid physical damage to containers.
- Use good occupational work practice.
- Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.
SUITABLE CONTAINER
- Polyethylene or polypropylene container.
- Packing as recommended by manufacturer- Check all containers are clearly labelled and free from leaks.
STORAGE INCOMPATIBILITY
Avoid reaction with oxidising agents.
STORAGE REQUIREMENTS
continued.
EQUINE RAZOR WORMER
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
For Workplace - Small Volume Use Only.

CHEMWATCH 4614-46
Issue Date: 7-Sep-2006
CD 2006/3 Page 4 of 9
NC317ELP
Section 7 - HANDLING AND STORAGE
- Keep containers securely sealed.
- No smoking, naked lights or ignition sources.
- Store in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area.
- Store away from incompatible materials and foodstuff containers.
- Protect containers against physical damage and check regularly for leaks.
- Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
EXPOSURE CONTROLS
The following materials had no OELs on our record under the following CAS or Chemwatch
(CW) numbers
• Equine Razor Wormer: No data available for CW:4614-46• praziquantel: No data available for CAS:55268-74-1• ivermectin: No data available for CAS:70288-86-7 CW:9538 INGREDIENT DATA
Airborne particulate or vapour must be kept to levels as low as is practicably achievable given access to modern engineering controls and monitoring hardware.
Biologically active compounds may produce idiosyncratic effects which are entirelyunpredictable on the basis of literature searches and prior clinical experience (bothrecent and past).
Therapeutic doses of 0.2 mg/kg do not produce signs of toxicity in avariety of species including humans.
There were no gross or histological changes seen in dogs treated withivermectin for 3 months (no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) =0.5 mg/kg/day) or in monkeys treated for 2 weeks (NOAEL = 1.2 mg/kg/day).
Changes in the spleen, bone marrow and kidneys were reported in ratstreated for 3 months (NOAEL = 0.4 mg/kg/day). Ivermectin produceddevelopmental toxicity in mice, rats and rabbits at or near dosage levelsthat were maternally toxic (NOAEL = 0.1 mg/kg/day in mice, the mostsensitive species). Neonatal rats are about 20 times more susceptible toivermectin than adult rats because the blood brain barrier is not fullydeveloped until after birth. There has been no evidence of teratogenicityin controlled studies in pregnant cattle, swine and dogs at up to threetimes the clinical dose nor has breeding performance been affected in continued.
EQUINE RAZOR WORMER
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
For Workplace - Small Volume Use Only.

CHEMWATCH 4614-46
Issue Date: 7-Sep-2006
CD 2006/3 Page 5 of 9
NC317ELP
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
various species.
The targeted clinical dosage of 0.15-0.2 mg/kg and doses in the range of3 to 12 mg are given according to body weight. Higher dosages (0.4 mg/kg)have been given to patients with lymphatic filariasis. For treatment ofonchocerciasis caused by Onchcerca volvulus, a leading cause of riverblindness in tropical areas), the drug is given only once every six ortwelve months. Ivermectin is metabolised in the liver and excreted almostexclusively in the faeces over a period of twelve days. The plasmahalf-life in man is about 10-12 hours for ivermectin and 3 days for itsmetabolites. Side-effects are not considered to be due to the toxicityof ivermectin as such, but are attributed to hypersensitivity reactionsresulting from the death of the microfilariae. In cases of accidentaloverdose with ivermectin, there have been no fatalities reported; howeversymptoms resemble those in animal studies.
An acceptable daily dose (ADI) of 0.8 mg/day was derived using the lowestdosage given clinically to adults (which is not associated with centralnervous system toxicity) and applying a 10 fold uncertainty factor toaccount for interindividual variability. The recommended exposure limit(0.08 mg/m³) recommended by Mercke, Sharp and Dohme, as an 8-hourTWA, and a wipe test criteria of 0.8 mg/100 cm2 were derived from the ADI.
PERSONAL PROTECTION
No special equipment for minor exposure i.e. when handling small quantities.
- OTHERWISE:- Safety glasses with side shields.
- Contact lenses may pose a special hazard; soft contact lenses may absorb andconcentrate irritants. A written policy document, describing the wearing of lens orrestrictions on use, should be created for each workplace or task. This should include areview of lens absorption and adsorption for the class of chemicals in use and an accountof injury experience. Medical and first-aid personnel should be trained in their removaland suitable equipment should be readily available. In the event of chemical exposure,begin eye irrigation immediately and remove contact lens as soon as practicable. Lensshould be removed at the first signs of eye redness or irritation - lens should beremoved in a clean environment only after workers have washed hands thoroughly. [CDCNIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletin 59].
HANDS/FEET
RESPIRATOR
Selection of the Class and Type of respirator will depend upon the level of breathingzone contaminant and the chemical nature of the contaminant. Protection Factors (definedas the ratio of contaminant outside and inside the mask) may also be important.
** - Continuous-flow or positive pressure demand.
continued.
EQUINE RAZOR WORMER
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
For Workplace - Small Volume Use Only.

CHEMWATCH 4614-46
Issue Date: 7-Sep-2006
CD 2006/3 Page 6 of 9
NC317ELP
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
The local concentration of material, quantity and conditions of use determine the tye ofpersonal protective equipment required.
For further information consult site specificCHEMWATCH data (if available), or yourOccupational Health and Safety Advisor.
ENGINEERING CONTROLS
General exhaust is adequate under normal operating conditions. If risk of overexposureexists, wear SAA approved respirator. Correct fit is essential to obtain adequateprotection. Provide adequate ventilation in warehouse or closed storage areas.
Section 9 - PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
APPEARANCE
White paste with a slight apple fragrance; does not mix with water.
PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
Does not mix with water.
Specific Gravity (water= 1): Not Available Relative Vapour Density (air=1): Not Available Lower Explosive Limit (%): Not Applicable Upper Explosive Limit (%): Not Applicable Section 10 - CHEMICAL STABILITY AND REACTIVITY INFORMATION
CONDITIONS CONTRIBUTING TO INSTABILITY
- Presence of incompatible materials.
- Product is considered stable.
- Hazardous polymerisation will not occur.
Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS
ACUTE HEALTH EFFECTS
SWALLOWED
Harmful if swallowed.
Macrolides comprise a large group of antibiotics derived from Streptomyces spp. having incommon a macrocyclic lactone ring to which one or more sugars are attached. They are allweak bases. The most common side effect produced by the family of macrolide antibioticsis gastrointestinal discomfort. Supra-infections may occur although these are rare.
Several macrolides produced allergic sensitisation but, again, these are rare. Symptomsinclude watery eyes, shortness of breath, nasal congestion, choking, coughing andwheezing. Allergic skin reactions have also occurred. Exposure to at least on member ofthe family, erythromycin, at high concentrations, has produced reversible deafness(ototoxicity). Systemic reactions including fever, rash, and lymph-node pain or swelling continued.
EQUINE RAZOR WORMER
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
For Workplace - Small Volume Use Only.

CHEMWATCH 4614-46
Issue Date: 7-Sep-2006
CD 2006/3 Page 7 of 9
NC317ELP
Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
have been produced by the avermectin group. Ivermectin has produced ataxia(incoordination), lethargy, bradypnea (slowed breathing), vomiting, mydriasis (dilatedpupils), sedation, tremors and death in animals. The avermectin group (anthelmintics,insecticides and acaricides) mediate the transmission of gamma-butyric acid (GABA), aninhibitory neurotransmitter, in mammals thus causing paralysis. Hepatotoxic effects withtransient disturbances and jaundice have resulted from the use of oleandomycin. Transientalterations in heart rate/ rhythm have also been produced by several members of thefamily (notably tilmicosin). Heart muscle degeneration, characterised by small areas ofcell death have also been reported in animals exposed to tilmicosin. Cross-resistance isoften observed between the macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin group of antibiotics.
Although the material is not thought to be an irritant (as classified by EC Directives),direct contact with the eye may produce transient discomfort characterised by tearing orconjunctival redness (as with windburn).
The material may cause skin irritation after prolonged or repeated exposure and mayproduce on contact skin redness, swelling, the production of vesicles, scaling andthickening of the skin.
Not normally a hazard due to non-volatile nature of product.
CHRONIC HEALTH EFFECTS
There is some evidence from animal testing that exposure to this material may result intoxic effects to the unborn baby.
As with any chemical product, contact with unprotected bare skin; inhalation of vapour,mist or dust in work place atmosphere; or ingestion in any form, should be avoided byobserving good occupational work practice.
TOXICITY AND IRRITATION
Not available. Refer to individual constituents.
unless otherwise specified data extracted from RTECS - Register of Toxic Effects of
Chemical Substances
Intraperitoneal (rat) LD50: 586 mg/kgSubcutaneous (rat) LD50: >16000 mg/kgIntramuscular (rat) LD50: >2000 mg/kgOral (mouse) LD50: 2454 mg/kgIntraperitoneal (mouse) LD50: 376 mg/kgSubcutaneous (mouse) LD50: 7172 mg/kgIntramuscular (mouse) LD50: >2000 mg/kgOral (dog) LD50: >200 mg/kgOral (rabbit) LD50: 1050 mg/kgNOTE: Substance has been shown to be mutagenic in at least one assay, or belongs to afamily of chemicals producing damage or change to cellular DNA.
* BayerADI: 0.02 mg/kg/dayNOEL: 20 mg/kg/day continued.
EQUINE RAZOR WORMER
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
For Workplace - Small Volume Use Only.

CHEMWATCH 4614-46
Issue Date: 7-Sep-2006
CD 2006/3 Page 8 of 9
NC317ELP
Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Dermal (rat) LD50: >660 mg/kg **Oral (mouse) LD50: 25 mg/kg **Intraperitoneal (mouse) LD50: 30 mg/kg **Dermal (rabbit) LD50: 406 mg/kgOral (dog) LD50: 80 mg/kg~Oral (monkey) LD50: >24 mg/kg **ADI: 0.8 mg/day *** [Mercke]** [Mercke, Sharpe and Dohme] Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Do NOT allow product to come in contact with surface waters or to intertidal areas belowthe mean high water mark. Do not contaminate water when cleaning equipment or disposingof equipment wash-waters.
Wastes resulting from use of the product must be disposed of on site or at approved wastesites.
Refer to data for ingredients, which follows: PRAZIQUANTEL:Ecotoxicology:Fish LC0 (96 h): Zebra barbel (Brachydanio rerio) 31.6 mg/l Daphnia EC50 (48 h): 35 mg/lEC100 (48 h): 100 mg/lBacterial toxicity EC50: >10000 mg/l; activated sludgeWater pollution class (WGK): 1 - slight water hazard (Bayer classification)WGK: Classification in accordance with German Water Resources Act.
EC50 is the Median Effective Concentration necessary to produce the biological effectunder study in 50% of the test species.
IVERMECTIN:Ecotoxicology:Fish LC50 (96 h): 3 ppb, bluegill sunfish 4.8 ppbDaphnia magna LC50 (48 h): 0.025 ppbNOEL: Daphnia magna 0.01 ppbEnvironmental Fate:Ivermectin photodegrades rapidly in the environment and is metabolised insoil. Water solubility is limited and it binds tightly to soil.
Ivermectin does not bioconcentrate in fish and is not taken up from soilby plants. Both aquatic and terrestial studies confirm the rapiddegradation of ivermectin in the environment and its lack of accumulationand persistence.
Section 13 - DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
- Recycle wherever possible or consult manufacturer for recycling options.
- Consult State Land Waste Management Authority for disposal.
- Bury residue in an authorised landfill.
- Recycle containers if possible, or dispose of in an authorised landfill.
continued.
EQUINE RAZOR WORMER
Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet
For Workplace - Small Volume Use Only.

CHEMWATCH 4614-46
Issue Date: 7-Sep-2006
CD 2006/3 Page 9 of 9
NC317ELP
Section 14 - TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
NOT REGULATED FOR TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS:UN, IATA,IMDG Section 15 - REGULATORY INFORMATION
POISONS SCHEDULE: S5
REGULATIONS
praziquantel (CAS: 55268-74-1) is found on the following regulatory lists; Australia Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS)Australia Poisons Schedule ivermectin (CAS: 70288-86-7) is found on the following regulatory lists; Section 16 - OTHER INFORMATION
This document is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purposes of private study, research, review orcriticism, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permissionfrom CHEMWATCH. TEL (+61 3) 9572 4700. Issue Date: 7-Sep-2006Print Date: 7-Sep-2006

Source: http://www.razorwormer.com/Downloads/MSDS%20Razor.pdf

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